Hours of Operation

Monday: 12 - 8pm

Tuesday-Thursday: 9am - 5pm

Closed Friday, Saturday, Sunday

Office: (724) 447-2283

Fax: (866) 593-4908

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Brain Drain

March 9, 2018

Equine encephalitis, also called "sleeping sickness," is a mosquito-transmitted disease that can cause severe inflammation of the brain in both horses and humans. There are three distinct versions of the disease, two of which are Eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) and Western equine encephalitis (WEE). 

As the name suggests, EEE is found primarily in the Eastern United States and Canada. WEE is prevalent in areas ranging from Argentina to Western Canada and in the United States in states west of the Mississippi River. Because the mosquito plays such a vital role in transmitting the disease, most cases are reported between June and November, although in warmer climates cases can be seen year round.

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Strike At the Heart

March 5, 2018

With the incidence of heartworm infection on the rise, and heartworm infection having been diagnosed in every state, it is more important than ever to make sure your pet is protected from this preventable disease.

According to the American Heartworm Society, only 4 in 10 dogs and 1 in 10 cats are on heartworm preventives. That leaves an awful lot of unprotected pets who are not only at risk of becoming infected with heartworms, but also of becoming contributors to the ongoing proliferation and spread of infection prevalence. Since 2013, the nationwide average number of heartworm-positive dogs has risen 21.7 percent. That means there are more heartworm-positive pets around from which a mosquito could transfer infection to yours, thereby increasing the potential for your pet to become infected if she is left unprotected.

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Open "Fleas-on"

March 1, 2018

Fleas and ticks are here again ... just kidding. They never really left. If your pet isn't currently protected from these pests with a flea and tick preventive, you are running the risk of an infestation of your pet that could -- and probably will -- turn into an infestation of your home in short order.

Fleas and ticks are opportunistic pests. They settle in wherever there is an opportunity for them to grow and reproduce. And once they're settled in, they are incredibly difficult to kick out. Under normal circumstances, adult fleas will live approximately three weeks and lay around 500 eggs each, while a single tick can lay up to 3,000 eggs. It is really easy for the pest population to get out of control quickly!

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In it Together - Devoted Resolutions

January 26, 2018

It’s a new year, and you have vowed to get in shape and improve your health. Although you might have made this resolution before only to fall back into old habits before the end of January, you mean it this time. The good news is that having a pet gives you even more motivation to achieve better health. Not only does the love of your furry companion give you the incentive to take better care of yourself, but it encourages you to improve your pet’s health as well.

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The Greatest Gifts

December 15, 2017

Your pet is a loved and valuable member of your family, so it only makes sense that you want to buy him a special holiday gift. If you decide on a toy, we at Springhill Animal Clinic would like to remind you of the following important safety considerations:

 

  • Your pet’s size: This is especially important when purchasing a chewable toy. A squeaky toy ball, for example, would be fine for a cat but not a large dog due to the potential choking hazard.

  • Stuffing material: Beads, foam, and other stuffing material could come loose from the toy if your pet bites it or tears it apart. If you choose a stuffed toy, be sure to supervise your pet until you know how she will react to it.

  • Attachments to toys: Items like ties, ribbons, plastic eyes, and even stitches can easily come loose and present a choking hazard to your dog or cat. You may want to consider removing these items first if your pet is especially rambunctious with toys.

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